Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Rebound Didache NABRE

I am happy to share with you a few photos from Max's recent rebinding of his Didache NABRE. This may be the most premium NABRE in existence! Enjoy!  

It only took two weeks from the day I mailed it to AA Leather to the day I held the completed project in my hands. I am very happy with the final result, although there are a few things I would have liked differently. The book block was too stiff to properly curve the spine, perhaps a 1/2 yapp would have been less surprising at first. Also, I entirely forgot to specify forest green endpages.


Details of the entire project:

1) MTF Didache NABRE Bible 
2) 24K gilt edges with red dye underneath
3) Black goatskin cover with forest green leather liner (AA Leather)






23 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks for sharing my photos, Tim! My initial thoughts have changed a little from what I told you before. I'm really liking the full yapp, and the lack of a rounded spine doesn't bother me at all (although I do prefer how it looks).

If anyone's interested, I can put some more photos on my Dropbox account and post a link here. I've taken some comparing my Didache with my Baronius Knox and CTS compact Bibles, as well as some photos outdoors that don't suffer from poor lighting like the ones Tim posted.

This Bible will easily last for a lifetime! It was a very expensive project, but more than worth it. It's one of those few things I've spent a lot money on that I really don't regret. :)


Max

Daniel said...

Very nice! I have an old family bible (1950's) that has a full yapp. It really helped keep the pages in nice condition over the years.

paul stevens said...

Looks great!

Jeff Burden said...

Psalms 23 reads so clunky in the NAB:RE

Tom said...

That's gobsmackingly beautiful.

Timothy said...

That leather looks amazing!

rolf said...

Enjoy!

paul stevens said...

This isn't AA s "Nappa" I think (I have had 5 AA rebinds). What goatskin was used?

paul stevens said...

Closer look it might be. Light and angle make it hard to know.

Anonymous said...

Paul, I'm not exactly sure what particular goatskin was used. Here's a link to my Dropbox album, maybe you'll be able to tell from the photos.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9bfge1nchudp7he/AADu7fKJn0GznuVokwpOAK_1a?dl=0


Max

Jeff Burden said...

Thanks for the link Max. It looks wonderful.

Thomas said...

This is off topic but does anyone know what bible translation Pope Francis reads? Any guesses?

Jason P said...

The Nova Vulgata, maybe also the Clementine Vulgate

rolf said...

Probably a Bible translation in his native tounge - Spanish.

Javier said...

Rolf,
you are right. Pope Francis reads en argentinian translation of the Bible, "El Libro del Pueblo de Dios". He has recently been presented with a new edition of this translation, and on receiving it he has said: "This is the one I use". Here is the source:
"This is the one I use"

This Bible is the only one in spanish on the Vatican site (this was done way before Francis became Pope). Here is the link:
El Libro del Pueblo de Dios

Gerald de Belen said...

O Papa Francisco, you practice what you preach..
And if I am right Javier, the Pope's personal version is a popular and liturgical version in Argentina.

Biblical Catholic said...

There are comparatively few Catholic translations available in Spanish, despite the fact that the majority of Spanish speakers are Catholic, most Spanish language Bibles are Protestant.

Probably most popular is the Reina-Valera, first published in 1569 with revisions in 1609, 1862, 1909, 1960, 1995 and 2011. There is also a Spanish edition of the NIV that is very popular.

Among Catholic translations, probably the most popular is the Spanish-language edition of the Jerusalem Bible.

Javier said...

Gerald,
you are right. The translation "El Libro del Pueblo de Dios" is the official liturgical version of the Bible for the Catholic Church in Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay.
It is also widely used in Argentina. I couldn't say if it is the most popular version here. It might perfectly be. The other two that compete for that position are "La Biblia de Nuestro Pueblo" by Fr. Luis Alonso Schökel, and "La Biblia Latinoamericana" by Fr. Hurault.

Javier said...

Biblical Catholic,
I would argue that there are more catholic translations of the bible in spanish that in english:
Catholic translations of the Bible in spanish

The Reina-Valera is an excellent protestant translation, that predates the KJV. It is 'The' Protestant spanish bible. It is written in a beautiful spanish. (And in a way, it is a tragedy that it never had the chance to influence and permeate spanish culture in the way the KJV influenced english culture). But you will never, ever, catch a catholic using it.
The spanish edition of the NIV, is the NVI (Nueva Versión Internacional).

Biblical Catholic said...

I'm not a native Spanish speaker, and I can read, but not speak Spanish, so I'll admit that I'm not very familiar with the Bible in Spanish, but all of the Spanish Bibles that I've been able to find are Protestant ones. The only Catholic ones I've ever found are the Jerusalem Bible and the 1835 translation of the Vulgate.

Unlike in English speaking countries, bishops in Spanish-speaking countries don't seem to have a tradition of sponsoring Spanish translations. The first "official" Spanish Catholic translation, official as in sponsored by the bishops, only seems to date back to 1944.

Javier said...

Biblical Catholic,
a brand new translation (of the New Testament. The whole bible is under way) sponsored by the CELAM (Latin American Council of Bishops) -and funded by the USCCB- has just been published. It is intended as a Bible for all the spanish speakers of the Americas. (In fact, the whole project began as a request from the USCCB to the CELAM, to fill a need for a bible for the spanish speaking catholics in the US).
Biblia de la Iglesia en América

Biblical Catholic said...

What I meant when I said that don't seem to be that many is that they all seem to be of recent origin, post World War II.

It seems that for centuries the Church just wasn't interested in sponsoring Spanish translations. There were Protestants making translations left and right, but Catholics produced The Biblia de Petisco y Torres Amat in 1825, and then nothing until after World War II. Since then, there have been a lot more, but it just seems like for centuries there was no translation activity being done, it was an almost entirely Protestant endeavour.

Javier said...

Biblical Catholic,
I think what you describe was more or less the situation for catholic bible translations in every language until Divino Afflante Spiritu in 1943.
Not that spanish speaking protestants produced much from the Reina Valera until the end of XX century.