Friday, March 6, 2015

Didache Bible: NABRE Edition

It is happening and will be released later this year.  I was informed about this by a representative from Midwest Theological Forum.  Official announcement will be made in the next month or two.

23 comments:

Luke said...

Wow I'm really surprised. Are they going to have to include the NABRE notes? That could turn it in to a pretty hefty volume.

Timothy said...

I have not seen the page layout, but have been assured that it will have both the NABRE notes and the CCC content. Best of both worlds, coming together.

Anonymous said...

This is actually kind of shocking. That would be a pretty handy Bible. I wonder if the print will be excruciatingly small? A marriage between the NABRE and an Opus Dei related Bible version? Shocking! Maybe the worm has turned.

vladimir998

Anonymous said...

I hate to sound selfish and harsh, but I wish they would publish the leather bound version of the current Bible before they go off and start something new.

Timothy said...

This one will also be available in leather. I am not sure when.

Anonymous said...

Is the current one available in leather?

Timothy said...

It will be sometime this year.

rolf said...

Great news for us NABRE fans! I think the way they can pull it off with the two sets of notes is to print the Didache Bible notes just as they are now (at the bottom of each page), and place the NABRE notes at the end of each Book of the Bible (as they do with the NABRE Large and Giant Print Bibles). I agree, the best of both worlds. The NABRE notes would be out of sight for those who don't like them.

rolf said...

I just hope that MTF doesn't make the the announcement of the new NABRE Didache Bible on April 1st!!!

Deacon Dave said...

Awesome news! Glad I waited on making my purchase of the Didache Bible...

Eric Barczak said...

Tim, I sure hope they didn't base this decision solely on my suggestion from the review about the missed opportunity for USA catechesis programs in not having the Didache Bible in NABRE. Of course, since it was listed on the cover as Ignatius Bible edition, I'm thinking they might have had this idea already in the works to do multiple editions long before I opened my mouth.

I do wish they'd lose the NABRE notes if they do this. If not, then as rolf suggested, in the back.

Of course, if Ignatius could marry the Didache Bible commentary into the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible (once completed), that would truly be game, set, match in the Catholic Bible world.

Timothy said...

Eric,

The funny thing is that I love the fact that the typically historical-critical notes of the NABRE are paired with the CCC nots of the Didache. I think it is a near perfect mix, which will make this bible quite resourceful.

Anonymous said...

Wonderful! Do keep us informed if you learn more information. Pax

Anonymous said...

The NABRE notes do not add to the equation in my opinion. How they were granted an imprimatur remains one of the mysteries of the western world.

Peter Brennan

Erica McCrea said...

If they do put the NABRE notes in (which they will) I hope they figure out a better layout than what's normally done. HarperOne and Oxford have managed to format things well—with the notes at the bottom or back rather than in that irritating double column layout. I don't really mind the notes, but their usual layout is so visually off-putting and user-unfirendly that it drives me nuts. The NABRE isn't my favorite translation, but two-thirds of why I don't like it involve the horrible page layout and dearth of decent editions. Please MTF, save us from the tacky St. Joseph bibles!

rolf said...

My guess is that MTF will keep the exact same page layout and notes that are in the current edition and the NABRE Bible notes will be placed in the back of each book.

Timothy said...

I have a feeling they are going to get it all in without endnotes. :)

rolf said...

Timothy, It is certainly possible that MTF could get permission from the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine and the USCCB to exclude the current NABRE notes due to the fact that they are providing full notes and introductions for each book. And the fact that the notes are based upon the Catechism wouldn't hurt their cause if they choose to go that route.

I am going to the Religious Ed. Congress in Anaheim this weekend, if MTF has a booth there, maybe I can gather some information.

rolf said...

In reference to my post above, MTF was not at the Religious Ed. Congress in Anaheim, CA this weekend so we will have to wait as the details for this Bible's notes slowly emerge.

Christopher Buckley said...

Oh yuck.

Though I prefer the RSV-2CE, I do have a soft spot for the NABRE too.

I just think it dilutes the brand of the Didache Bible to make it available in multiple translations.

As long as Catholics have a tight distinction between lectionaries for liturgical use and translations approved for private study and devotion, I kind of like the idea of having a different Bible translation for prayer and study. That way, I can hear NAB (or Jerusalem) at Mass and in Liturgy of the Hours, but turn to the RSV-2CE as a kind of benchmark for personal devotion.

Besides, the NABRE NT is being revised now anyway. Why issue ANY new editions until the translation is finished? http://catholicbiblical.org/news-archives/nabnt-revision

Timothy said...

Christopher,

The reason why is that the revision will likely take 10 years. The NAB is going to be more useful for high school students. Vast majority of schools are going to prefer the NABrE over the RSV.

Christopher Buckley said...

I think it's more like 15 years actually (est. date 2021, I believe).

I question the difference in reading levels. To my eye, they are very similar on a Fleisch-Kincaid reading scale.

The better differentiator is that NABRE arguably relies on a better textual basis, using current Greek NT editions as opposed to the RSV's, which barely had access to the Dead Sea Scrolls at the time of translation.

GoSox455 said...

Are the NABRE notes available anywhere as a separate volume?