Thursday, February 19, 2015

An Update on "One Bible, One Year"

So, those of you who have joined me on this, how are you doing?  I have been doing ok, although I have made a slight adjustment.  At various points over the past month and a half I have been "tempted" to switch to a different Bible edition.  While switching to a different translation has never been the issue, the edition that I want to read from has evolved a bit.

As I posted on January 1st, I committed to reading from two NRSV's, the 1991 NOAB and the HarperOne Compact Thinline for the entire year.  I plan on doing a post soon as to why I chose the NRSV translation, but I will simply say now that I think the NRSV does the best of combining beautiful language with a (generally) formal equivalence translation philosophy, making it good for both reading and study.  As I said, more on this in a future post.

For study and teaching, I have remained steadfast in using my beloved 1991 NOAB NRSV.  It contains all the cross-references and annotations that I need on a daily basis as a teacher.  I always seem to go back to this Bible, ever since I found it a few years back.  However, the one thing that makes this Bible great, its large margins and easy reading page layout, makes it a bit difficult to use as a daily reading Bible for my morning prayer time or to take to a prayer group.

The Bible that I intended to be my reading Bible, the HarperOne Compact Thinline, is a fine Bible, but it just hasn't fit "my needs."  Strange thing to say, huh?  I feel even silly writing those word to be honest.  With all the issues in the world today, I am worrying about something like this!  However, the past month or so I feel like I have come to an important discovery about my relationship between prayer and scripture.  I would say that my main issue, which I have only realized through prayer, is the need to simply read the Bible without any study helps or maps or commentary or even a concordance!  I get too distracted with all those things.  I need to strip those things away and simply become immersed in the sacred word.  So, that is what I am going to do and, as we enter Lent, what a perfect time to do it!  In a future post, I will share with you the Bible I am going to use for this, which was generously offered to me by someone else.   I have come to prefer it for its portability and page layout.  More on this soon.

So, that is where I am at right now.  How are you?

32 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm well into my Knox Bible, reading two chapters of the Old Testament, a Psalm, and one chapter of the New Testament every day. Mathematically speaking, finishing the entire Bible in one year at a rate of four chapters a day is entirely achievable, but I'm going to have to adjust what I read daily as soon as I finish the Psalms and New Testament.

Joel said...

That is an eyeopener Tim..really grateful for that post. The main concern has to be the sacred word. I can study Scripture but sometimes I just struggle to read it patiently. Thanks again

Deacon Dave said...

Your desire to not be distracted by historical or textual notes is why I use my Christian Community Bible: Catholic Pastoral Edition for lectio prayer. I have been using it for years and now have the latest revised edition copyright 2013, not to be confused with the New Community Bible (Alba House) which many thought was a updated rehash of the CCB:CP. I like it because I find the notes to be much more devotional or inspirational and thus an aid to prayer and forming resolutions for behavior as a fruit of prayer.

Russ said...

Tim:
Does this mean I can have all your other bibles?

Tim said...

The need to strip away notes and maps and page headings and even chapter and verse numbering is something I share. I have longed for an RSV-CE or NRSV sans anything except the inspired text and am waiting with baited breath to hear that it is available at discount at some clearance website, or offered by a cloistered monk who hand wrote the whole thing and doesn't mind us borrowing it for a year or two.

-Tim-

Russ said...

Deacon, isn't that difficult to find in the States? Where did you get it?

Timothy said...

Tim,

Ever think about getting one of the large Saint Johns Bible editions?

Anonymous said...

I've been using Cambridge's NRSV Reference with Apocrypha and it's been going well so far. I've been reading the daily readings with it instead of using my Missal, a practice I'd done in college, and I'm enjoying it more than the Missal. The cross-references, maps, and glossary are easy to ignore when I just want to read the text, and the paragraph headings are not distracting for me.

With that said, I should be receiving the Bibliotheca bible with apocrypha later this year (in 5 volumes hardcover) that will not have anything other than the text, not even bible verses. So it may be hard not to start reading that once I receive it.

Michael P.

Anonymous said...

Correction to my post regarding the Bibliotheca bible: meat to write "not even bible verse numbers" not "...bible verses"!

Michael P.

Anonymous said...

Interesting fact: it doesn't appear that Cambridge is selling the NRSV Reference Bible with Apocrypha any longer. I wonder if we'll see it in an Allan edition in the near future?

Michael P.

Timothy said...

Something to start praying for! :)

Anonymous said...

"meant" not "meat" - time to go to bed!

Michael P.

rolf said...

I agree Timothy that an Allan NRSV (maybe a Catholic edition?) with the deutrocanonical books would be something to pray (and save) for! I think that I would only consider buying one if it came out in a Catholic edition. I already have the Cambridge reference NRSV with the Deutrocanonical books, so for me there would no reason to buy another especially at $200.+

Well I didn't do the one Bible only for one year challenge (impossible!), but I am reading one Bible for the 'Read the Catholic Bible in one year' reading plan. I started on Jan 1, and like Timothy I made a slight adjustment. Since I received the new Didache Bible in mid January I have switched to it for this reading plan (after going back and re-reading the prior 15 days of the plan over again). I made the switch because it was a way to get acquainted with the new Bible and I am reading all the notes and apologetic inserts as I go along. I am enjoying this reading plan and the Bible very much!

Thomas said...

Timothy: I have A readers edition of the RSV-CE that I read from sometimes. It has no notes or headings or anything like that. Just the text. If you look online you can often find them for a decent price. They were co-published by ignatius press and oxford university press several years back.

http://www.amazon.com/Revised-Standard-Version-Catholic-Bible/dp/0195288629/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1424468210&sr=8-6&keywords=Ignatius+bible+readers+edition

Anonymous said...

rolf,

I agree. Having the Cambridge reference NRSV with the Deutrocanonical books, I wouldn't get an Allan edition of the same bible. Unfortunately, considering Allan doesn't appear to currently publish any Catholic editions, I doubt we'll see them do so anytime soon.

Michael P.

Timothy said...

Michael,

Having spoken with Allan's I know that they are trying to find a text block that they could use that meets their standards. They are having trouble finding any Catholic one that is comparable to what they publish.

Erica M said...

Tim,

So far, my OBOY challenge has kind of collapsed. I'm having trouble finding an NRSV that is actually a good, usable size, so at this point I've returned to my hardcover Ignatius Bible. I loved the Cambridge, but even if it weren't toast, it's a little unwieldy for me. I tried the Oxford Pocket NRSV with Apocrypha, but the text was so tiny I had to return it. Even though I'd prefer the NRSV, it looks like the RSV is my best bet for usability at this point.

I'm looking into the reader's RSV, but I'll just stick with my trusty Ignatius for now.

Anonymous said...

Timothy,

Thanks for the info. In a way, that's even more depressing, that there are no good quality text blocks for Catholic bibles. It's one of the reasons I use the Cambridge NRSV Reference with Apocrypha as my main bible, I find it's text block is nicer than what I can find in a Catholic edition.

Do you know if Allan is considering all Catholic translations (in particular, JB, NJB, NABRE, RSV2CE) or just the NRSV?

Michael P.

Timothy said...

Michael,

They are looking primarily at the NRSV, although others could be a possibility. I know you have seen the txt blocks that Allan's typically utilize. Compared to almost all Catholic ones, they simply don't meet the standard. Translations like the RSV-2CE come in so limited number of styles that it likely disqualifies them. The NABRE has a generic look to many of the its editions, although there are more options today than in the past. Since Allan's would be investing in something like this, for the first time, cost is an issue. So when you combine available text blocks, which meet their standards, and the fact that they want people to actually buy them, since all of Allan's Bibles are limited run, then the NRSV is clear #1 option. Being based in London also makes options other than the NRSV unlikely.

Erica M. said...

Tim et. al.,

For those of you who have experience with both the Cambridge and Oxford NRSV's (text editions), which do you prefer? So far, my little pocket Oxford was nice—the text edition in leather seems like what I was aiming for when I bought its dwarf-sized cousin. However, I think the Cambridge has thicker, nicer paper and a better looking text. So between Cambridge and Oxford, which would you choose?

Timothy said...

Erica,

I have a review that will be posted next week concerning an NRSV compact that I really like. It is from Oxford. I also really like the 91 NOAB NRSV. With that being said, the Cambridge reference is a superior in quality of production and layout. For the price, however, the leather cover, which is Moroccan leather, should be better. I wish Allan's would use it for a future Bible.

Erica M. said...

Tim,

I think I know which edition you are thinking of. I do also wish Allan's would get around to publishing a nice Dueterocanon-inclusive text also. In the meantime, I finally got my own OBOY Challenge update post written.

https://oothew.wordpress.com/2015/02/21/oboy-challenge-oh-boy/

Have a blessed weekend.

Daesy71 said...

Deacon Dave, I, too would like to purchase "Christian Community Bible: Catholic Pastoral Edition".....would like to have info on where and how to do that. Thank you.

Erica McCrea said...

All Looking for the CCB Pastoral Edition,

I found this. It looks like the right bible.

http://www.amazon.com/Christian-Community-Bible-Catholic-Pastoral/dp/8428520496

Thomas said...

For those looking for a christian community bible get one of the following, make sure it has that exact cover. I have a copy of the red one and it doesn't have any of the weird feminist stuff in it that the other like some other versions have.


http://www.amazon.com/Christian-Community-Bible/dp/9715012833/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1424652499&sr=1-4&keywords=christian+community+bible



http://www.amazon.com/Christian-Community-Bible-Catholic-Pastoral/dp/971501366X/ref=sr_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1424652499&sr=1-5&keywords=christian+community+bible

rolf said...

The Christian Community Bible is also available on kindle.

Russ said...

Thanks for the links to the CCB, Pastoral Edition. However, those are to the 1988 edition. I understant there's a 2013 edition that is available.Kind of strange that it's so hard to find. I guess it's issued from overseas?

Timothy said...

Is this it:
http://www.amazon.com/The-Community-Bible-Catholic-Edition/dp/192196314X

Jason Engel said...

Erica,
Since you mentioned liking the Oxford compact NRSV with Apocrypha, I thought you might enjoy getting a copy of the larger reader edition, the 9814A. Oxford stopped publishing them just over a year ago, and they have since vanished from the market. I was going to share a link with you to the last online store that had them in stock, but just now as I went to get a link to the product page I discovered that they are now out of stock! Amazing, considering they had them in stock just this last Saturday. Anyway, you could still find some used copies from various sellers on Amazon, but prices are rising.

Russ said...

Tim, I don't think so. There's a newer version from 2013 that Deacon Dave referenced. Deacon Dave, are you out there? Hellllllloooooo? :)

Erica McCrea said...

Jason,

I saw that edition when I was looking the other week. Eventually I decided to go with the Oxford NRSV CE Reader's edition. I was able to find it in leather for a good price, and I really wanted a Catholic bible with all the books in proper order. It also has the daily Mass readings in the back, which I'm excited about. Hopefully the seller was truthful in his description.

Gerald de Belen said...

Does One Missal, One Year count? That did well for me.
Bit off track, eh?