Thursday, August 22, 2013

The NAB: New African Bible


I received in the mail, from the Pauline Sisters in Africa, these two new editions of the New African Bible.  The New African Bible was published back in 2011 and includes the New American Bible Revised Edition translation with completely new intros and commentary.  I wanted to give you all a sneak peak of the standard hardbound edition, which is in a single-column setting, and the compact edition.  More to come in the coming weeks when I hopefully have a bit more time to write up a proper review.  However, if you have any questions, feel free to comment here.  Also, below is some additional information on the New African Bible from the Paulines site.  To order, you can contact them at distribution@paulinesafrica.org.

SECOND EDITION OF "THE AFRICAN BIBLE"!
This second edition of "The African Bible", from now on, will be called "The New African Bible" and rightly so. The features are the same. However, this new edition contains the revised version of the Old Testament from the New American Bible. The New Testament was already revised in the first edition. The revision was done over 35 years in order to bring the biblical text closer to the original texts. Introductions, comments and notes have been revised and many added. The Glossary comes to you with many more entries, making it a precious tool for students and those who want to deepen relevant specific topics. New illustrations were also added. The African Bible now has 2240 pages and it costs only US$ 15.00. A golden-edge edition is also available and it costs only US$ 25.00.


In summary, The African Bible presents the following characteristics: 
•Introductions to each book giving updated information about the book and the theological and pastoral relevance for Africa today.
•Explanatory notes are provided in the various domains of exegesis, theol¬ogy and spirituality as well as in catechesis and pastoral ministry. 
•The comments, running alongside the biblical text, work as a key to un¬derstand a chapter or a section of the book and to see the relevance of the passage in Africa today. 
•The illustrations aim at making the historical background easier to understand and offer an artistic insight into some texts.
•The Bible is enriched by cross-references, the 3-year cycle of liturgical readings, the chronology,' and the glossary/thematic index.



28 comments:

Anonymous said...

Could please compare some of the intros / commentary / footnotes of the NABRE and The African Bible?

Timothy said...

If you have one or two you'd like me to post, just let me know which ones.

owen swain said...

How did they manage permission for new notes and commentary? I thought it was mandatory that the translation come with its approved supplemental text. Interesting. Is it because it is produced (unless I assume incorrectly) for a primarily non American market?

Timothy said...

They received approval from those in charge of such things at the USCCB. It has original annotations which therefore meets the need of having study helps.

owen swain said...

Dear Anon,

Clicking the link to the Pauline Sisters site will provide you with several examples of notes. "Inculturation" of the content seems the thrust and may in part answer my own question.

owen swain said...

Ah, thanks Timothy.
R
P.S. in an odd/unexpected turn of bible reading events I have been spending considerable time reading the NABRE. Someone may want to decommission me as a Catholic because I am very much likely this translation and, wait for it, am not having the kind of issues some people seem to have with what they read into the purpose of these 'inclusive' language or the notes. I know. Egad!

Timothy said...

Owen,

I think the NABRE does better than most people give it credit for. Many dislike the notes and cite that as the NAB's biggest problem, without really examining the translation itself, minus a few unique renderings. It uses moderate inclusive language and has moved more towards formal equivalency over the years. And while many a recent translation has avoided terms like 'Son of Man', the NABRE has retained it in almost every instance. It also does some things really well, in comparison to others, like the "I AM" sayings in John as well as retaining "Amen, Amen I say to you..." There are many others, however people tend to limit their analysis of the NABRE to Gen 1:2, Is 9:5, and Luke 1:28.

Theophrastus said...

The binding and illustrations remind me of the Christian Community Bible. Is that just a coincidence, or is there some overlap between the notes of this African edition and the CCB?

Timothy said...

Nope, the notes are completely unique. There is a list of contributors at the front of the Bible, which includes Cardinal Turkson, who was a much touted Papal candidate at the most recent Conclave.

Jonny said...

Tim:

Speaking of Paulines Publications, do you know anything about their African edition of Liturgy of the Hours? It includes the Revised Grail Psalms, and is the only English edition based on Liturgia Horarum, editio typica altera (the current Latin Edition, 1985.)

http://paulinespublicationsafrica.blogspot.com/p/liturgy-of-hours.html

Here is another link with some pictures:

http://www.stutler.cc/russ/african_breviary.html

I have one thing to say: "Glory be!"

Timothy said...

Jonny,
It looks great huh?

I am not buying any LOTHs until the revised edition comes out, but that edition is tempting.

Michael Demers said...

Timothy,
Daria Sockey at her blog, Coffee and Canticles (dariasockey.blogspot.com), bought the African LOTH and she's quite pleased with it. If I remember right, she said that it contains the Revised Grail Psalter and the New American Bible Revised Edition.

Timothy said...

Funny you bring this up since I just saw her book yesterday at a local catholic bookstore. Thanks!

Biblical Catholic said...

I wonder if the notes are any better than the standard NAB, my biggest problem with the NAB are the horrible notes.

Timothy said...

After spending a few days with them, I think most people who dislike the ones found in the standard American edition will love the ones on the New African.

Jonny said...

Tim:

I was going to wait for the revised version of LOTH too... that is, before I bought the 4 volume set.

Did you see the one volume version for $25, "The Prayer of the Church?" It is basically comparable to Christian prayer, although more up to date and user friendly.

Does anyone know the status on the US revised version of LOTH? I had heard it was going to be 5+ years, and that was before the re-revised NAB plans were announced, which seemed to suggest a revision of LOTH along with it. Might we be waiting 10-15 years in the US?

Even if it is only 5 years away, to me it is worth the 25 bucks (50, because I have to buy a copy for my wife as well :)) I just hope the shipping isn't outrageous. I already emailed Paulines, I will post another comment when I know what it costs.

Pomeranian Catholic said...

I kind of really want this New African Bible.... :-D

CJA Mayo said...

I actually want to give this Bible a try - that's rare for me and an NAB. It's single-column (the only NAB I've ever seen formatted thus: it looks a lot like the NJPS Jewish Study Bible), and is at least missing the regular annotation (again, the only one I've seen formatted thus), which is 75% of the problem with the translation.

Tim: from your comment above, can I assume the notes are a bit more faithful than the NAB?

I wish Amazon had it in stock.

Timothy said...

I think people who dislike the standard NAB notes will be quite happy with the ones in this edition.

Jonny said...

$19.50 to ship 2 copies of "The Prayer of the Church" to the USA.

I thought about adding an African Bible to my order, but I guess I have to draw the line somewhere.

I am totally excited about praying the Revised Grail Psalms! BTW, anyone that enjoys the LOTH might also want to check out the Extraordinary Form Breviary from St. Micheal's Abbey:
http://www.theabbeyshop.com/product_info.php?products_id=745&osCsid=874d42e3306bfb7b36c60c287e9ce434

I got mine from Amazon rather than ordering from the UK. This one has the Vulgate and a unique English text similar to the DRC.

owen swain said...

@CJA Mayo there is another single column NABRE - the Little Rock Study. However, the standard NABRE notes accompany the LR notes so you may not like it.

- - -

Frankly, the more I read the NABRE notes and text the less issues I have with either. I look back on I'll informed and biased comments I myself have made in the past here and on other blogs regarding the NABRE&notes and regret having done so. I am grateful to be humbled.

owen swain said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
owen swain said...

I used the Monastic Diurnal for half a yea. I have returned to the LoTH. I would be happy to sell my gentey used copy. Mine came from an Abbey in the USA but is the edition shown inthe link above. I also have a regular size black leather Baronius Press D-R in top condition to sell.

owen swain said...

Predictive spell kills me. Even my correction got corrected. Argh.

"ill" not "I'll" in my comment above.

CJA Mayo said...

Owen: email me at camayo007@gmail.com with an offer for what you're willing to part with the DRC for, if it's the leather over board one.

Anyone else who is buying a New African Bible, and is willing to buy an extra, I will pay either $20 or $30 (depending on whether it's gold or not) plus shipping via Paypal for one once it gets to America. There's no convenient and secure way (at least in my paranoid mind, which will give credit card numbers to no site that starts not with "A" and ends with "azon") to get one from Paulist.

Theo said...

Can I just say, considering the comment above, that we should all be thinking very carefully about using Amazon for anything in the future now they have 'come out' in support and promotion of same-sex 'marriage'.

I have thrown out my Kindle and will never give them another cent

Russ Stutler said...

I'm glad my photos of the African breviary were useful. When I was researching this a few months back to see if I should order a copy, there no photos on the web and very little information. So I quickly plugged up this gap with my own photos.

Thomas said...

I know this is an old post but I had a question. If you still have the african bible compact edition what is the binding? is it a paperback or does it have a vinyl cover or something else? I was thinking about purchasing one and was curious? Thanks. Tom.