Saturday, December 22, 2012

How about one in the NRSV-CE?

11 comments:

rolf said...

Yeah, I won't buy any of their Bibles because they don't have one with the deutro-canonical books included.

Timothy said...

We should definitely consider sending them an email encouraging them to produce a Catholic edition, in the NRSV, NABRE, or even RSV-CE.

Steve said...

Getting very frustrating year, after year, after year, waiting for a quality Catholic Edition of ANY version. I'm pretty much at the point where I'd spend anything to get an Allan or Cambridge version of the RSV, NRSV, NABRE or DR etc. What the heck do we have to do to get one of these publishers to respond to us Catholics looking for something of this quality?

Timothy said...

Steve,

Yes it is very frustrating. The closest we have is the NRSV Reference Bible with Apocrypha from Cambridge. Email Allan's!

Javier said...

Timothy,

isn't Allan a commited evangelical publisher?. Why would they ever publish a Catholic Bible?. It is a bit like asking them to publish the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Timothy said...

Javier,

Fair question. I would say that we are seeing historically evangelical publishers like Zondervan and Baker begin publishing Catholic material.

Biblical Catholic said...

There has been a considerable 'mellowing' of evangelicalism recently....an almost complete de-emphasis on doctrine and theology and an influence on warm and fuzzy feel goodism...the end result is that the doctrinal relativism means that evangelicals are a lot more favorably disposed towards Catholicism than they were 20 or even 10 years ago...let alone 50 years ago.....

I mean....heck think about it... in 1960 many evangelicals voted for Nixon over Kennedy because they didn't want to 'mainstream Catholicism'....in 2012....most evangelicals voted for Mitt Romney, a Mormon...everyone was convinced that Romney being a Mormon would be a huge issue with the evangelicals, but in the end they didn't care.....in 1960, Norman Vincent Peale and many other prominent evangelicals pastors rallied against Kennedy..and at the Republican convention anti-Kennedy evangelicals distributed quarters where George Washington was given a Papal miter with a felt tip marker to express their fear of 'Romanist domination'...in 2012 pretty much no evangelicals of any note expressed any religious based reservations about Romney...so they've gone from 'the country will go to hell in a hand basket it we elect a Catholic' to 'sure let's put a Mormon in the White House, that's no biggie'....and Paul Ryan is Catholic too...another thing the evangelicals didn't care about....

One of the positive things about the doctrinal relativism of modern evangelicals is that they are a lot more to Catholicism than they ever have been before.

Jose Grajo said...

I corresponded with Mr. Nicholas Gray at Allan's. It was a very pleasant conversation and I was very surprised with how receptive he is. As Timothy said, it would not hurt to send an e-mail. Interestingy enough, they are a rather small publisher and take well to consumer feedback. Merry Christmas!

Jason Engel said...

I have one of these Allan NRSV Bibles. It is gorgeous. Allan uses a bookblock from Collins (the UK division of HarperCollins Publishers), typesetting by Nigel Lynn Publishing, printed by RR Donnelly in China.

Collins also produced a bookblock with the Apocrypha with the same typesetting. You could try to obtain that bookblock and give it to one of those many custom boobinderines like Leonard's to have them bind it in a style and quality to Allan's.

The ISBN of the Collins NRSV with Apocrypha is:
HB ISBN 978 0 00 724286 3

CJA Mayo said...

It's one of the reasons I've settled both for a New Cambridge Paragraph Bible (which is nice, but not top-end), or, alternately, using two books, one with the apocrypha and one with the protocanon.

I wonder how the Cameo Reference Edition is, pictured in the post above this one? King James text with apocrypha - but it has red letter and is in two column, verse by verse setting. If I'm going to read a Bible that looks like a dictionary, I might as well ditch the King and go for the Emperor, a DRC.

Jonny said...

I actually prefer the Cameo Bible over the Paragraph edition, although not for the format. The Cameo has the cross-references (not a whole lot of them, but into and out of the deutros), the phonetical pronunciation marks, of course the translation notes, and the added words in italics. I use the KJV primarily for comparing translations, and the italicized words help me see how renderings in the RSV (and other translations) are derived from interpretations of the KJV translators. Many times I have found obscure DR readings to be simply a closer reflection of the original language without interpretation or embellishment, by comparing with the Cameo. As far as the quality of the book goes, it has thicker, stiffer calfskin leather than the Paragraph Bible, which I prefer. The Cameo also has less bleed-through, which is surprising considering it is quite a bit more compact!