Tuesday, December 18, 2012

HarperOne NABRE Non-Flex Imitation Leather

Well, the question as to what HarperOne meant by "non-flex imitation leather" has been answered.  It is similar to what Baronius Press has done with its Knox Bible, a hardback edition which is covered in (bonded) leather.  In this case, however, HarperOne has simply used imitation leather, which I greatly disliked in the flexible imitation leather edition that came out in May.  (If you observe the photo on the left, you will see that the imitation leather is on the left, while the hardcover is on the right.)  Needless to say, this is a disappointment.  Why even produce a cover like this one when you already have the hardcover edition?  That simply doesn't make much sense to me.  I would have much preferred that they simply used bonded leather, like they utilized in their NRSV thinline Bibles.  Actually, I really liked the feel of the NRSV Compact Thinline, which came out in 2009.

Ultimately, if you are desiring an edition of the NABRE, the hardcover one is the way to go.  It is too bad really, since I believe that HarperOne has created a very attractive page layout with their NABRE.  Its a shame that they never completed the package by producing it in a good leather, or even imitation leather, cover.  Again, stick with the hardcover edition.

18 comments:

Colleague said...

What a waste of materials.

I must say that I'm still in love with my rebind from Leonard's; however, Oxford's compact NABRE fits the bill for my daily needs 98% of the time.

Biblical Catholic said...

What is the appeal of a leather cover? I have to admit that I don't get that.

Theophrastus said...

Ah, exactly as I suspected.

It is often the case that the hardcover is not only the cheapest option for purchase, but the best. This is particularly true for books that one is going to store in a bookshelf or use primarily in one place (e.g., at home or at the office)

Michael Demers said...

I like the NABRE hardback by HarperOne but the print really should have been a little bigger.

Timothy said...

Michael,

Yeah, a little bigger would have been very good!

CJA Mayo said...

I can't tell the difference between the two, except the one on the left looks a little newer. What he said.

CJA Mayo said...

Biblical Catholic: if you don't get the appeal of leather, well, you don't get the appeal of leather. It's like Trappist tripel ale or a good Stout Porter.

As for me, I'll read my Bible bound in goat, a sacrifice acceptable unto the LORD God.

Anonymous said...

"It is similar to what Baronius Press has done with its Knox Bible, a hardback edition which is covered in (bonded) leather"

Are you suggesting the Baronius Knox offering is bonded leather? I have one on order and I sure hope it is not bonded leather.

Anonymous said...

"It is similar to what Baronius Press has done with its Knox Bible, a hardback edition which is covered in (bonded) leather." My first try didn't go through.

Are you saying the Baronius Knox bible is bonded leather and not genuine?

Timothy said...

Correct. It is bonded.

Timothy said...

But it is still very nice nonetheless. Remember it is a hardback edition.

Colleague said...

The Baronius Bibles in hardback bonded leather are nice Bibles, indeed. I once owned a copy of their Douay-Rheims, and it was a favorite for awhile. A bit uncomfortable in the hand, at times, but overall a nice, highly durable product.

I've not seen the Knox Bible - nor do I plan on purchasing one - but if it's anything like the quality which Baronius put into their Douay-Rheims, it won't be a letdown.

Anonymous said...

Dogonenit! All the reviews I saw led me to think it (Knox) was real leather. Nobody said bonded! All other Baronius books I have seen are real leather. Son of a gun booger! as my 92 year old mother says.

Timothy said...

Anon
Many if the recent Baronius Press editions have used bonded leather. Let me just say, the Knox bible is a hardcover with bonded leather and it is still magnificent. Don't be scared away.

Eric Barczak said...

Tim-

It looks like Wal-Mart has the non-flex imitation leather Bibles for $20 & change rather than $23 for the regular hardback. Couple questions for you: is the non-flex sewn bound or glued? Other than not liking the imitation leather (which doesn't bother me), is there any reason why I should not save a couple dollars on this?
Thanks.

Timothy said...

Eric,

I believe it is sewn. I don't have that edition anymore so I can't say for sure. If you don't mind the imitation leather, I'd say go for it. I still believe that this is the nicest looking NABRE on the market.

Eric Barczak said...

Tim-How do you think it compares to the Little Rock Study Bible?

Timothy said...

Eric,

Apples and oranges comparison really. Both have the same translation and notes, but Little Rock has a ton of extra stuff, including essays, in-text maps, pictures, information, charts, and the Sunday lectionary. The one drawback is that it is pretty big, compared to the HarperOne. I like them both really. I really like the LRCSB, particularly because it has a fantastic single column layout as well.