Monday, August 27, 2012

Semi-Regular Weekly Poll

10 comments:

Kai Welday Engel said...

There's that ESV with apocrypha from Oxford, but the translation of the apocryphal content was not done by Crossway, and appears to have been stuck in the back as a sort of academic appendix that some conservative evangelical scholars might like to have on hand. I think that's as close as you'll get for a long time, unless Crossway suddenly decides it needs more money. A quick search on the Crossway store shows it sells exactly 1 book with any sort of Catholic reference, and its a criticism.

Timothy said...

Very true about the ESV w/ Apocrypha from Oxford. Also keep in mind, however, that the English speaking countries outside of the USA and Canada, for example the UK, are moving to an ESV-based lectionary. Apparently, they already received permission to do this from Crossway.

mike7up said...

I am convinced that once the ESV Lectionary is introduced an ESV-CE will eventually follow. But I expect it to be published outside of the U.S. I can never see Crossway wanting to be a part of that publication. So maybe Oxford will cash in on that market.

rolf said...

I agree with mike7up, I think they will eventually give permission to Oxford or another publisher to print it.

Timothy said...

I wonder if the ESV Lectionary is licensed through Crossway or Oxford? That would certainly make a difference.

Biblical Catholic said...

Crossway's attitude kind of ticks me off.....given that they have to know how popular the ESV is with Catholics...what possible reason is there to not publish, or at least license, a Catholic Edition? Catholic money is as good anybody else's isn't it?

Timothy said...

Could it be that some at Crossway do not consider Catholics to be Christian?

Amfortas said...

I find the decision - if, indeed, a decision has been made - to move to an ESV lectionary quite bizarre. I wonder what advice Henry Wansbrough is giving the bishops.

Jason Engel said...

I would be inclined to think that the RCC would want control over the license of any -CE English translation of the Bible. Relying on a corporate entity that obviously does not like your denomination to provide your Bibles seems like a bad move.

Unrelated - I finally have my name appearing correctly in Google Blogger. I have no idea how it ended up using my son's name. Sorry for confusing everyone.

Biblical Catholic said...

The ESV is probably the best Tyndale based translation currently on the market, I mean I guess that they could have gone with the RSV, but that thing is 60 years old...a little out of date though still excellent...

And a translation based on the Tyndale-King James textual tradition is to be preferred, because frankly nearly 500 years after the fact, no one has yet topped Tyndale's literary style....Tyndale deserves to be put in the same category as Shakespeare and Chaucer, among the very best authors the English language has ever produced......